CentOS 6 now can be choose
#11
can't you do something like preupgrade in fedora?
#12
(08-04-2011, 01:49 AM)Boltersdriveer Wrote: It's nearly impossible to upgrade the OS on a VPS.

-Bolts.

Its possible, but a huge pain and not recommended or supported. I hear Red Hat won't support your system if you do an upgrade from RHEL 5 to 6 rather than a new install. There is just too many differences between the versions; rpm versions being incompatible with each other is a major one.
#13
(08-04-2011, 05:39 AM)f8ll Wrote:
(08-04-2011, 01:49 AM)Boltersdriveer Wrote: It's nearly impossible to upgrade the OS on a VPS.

-Bolts.

Its possible, but a huge pain and not recommended or supported. I hear Red Hat won't support your system if you do an upgrade from RHEL 5 to 6 rather than a new install. There is just too many differences between the versions; rpm versions being incompatible with each other is a major one.

Yep. You should make backups of your current server and rebuild with the new template the provider provides.

-Bolts.
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#14
With Linux there's kind of a rule, "don't touch it if it is working". For example, the VPS that hosts my blog has a huge RAM usage (250MB or above), but as it's working well and stable (150+ days uptime), I'm not going to touch it Smile
And BTW I don't think I every performed an apt-get upgrade or yum update on a VPS.
#15
(08-04-2011, 08:44 AM)gbl08ma Wrote: With Linux there's kind of a rule, "don't touch it if it is working". For example, the VPS that hosts my blog has a huge RAM usage (250MB or above), but as it's working well and stable (150+ days uptime), I'm not going to touch it Smile
And BTW I don't think I every performed an apt-get upgrade or yum update on a VPS.

yeah, i hear ya. i had a server for minecraft working on a server, and i tried reconfiguring my server, and it ruined the entire vps.
#16
I have CentOS for my Crappy Shared Hosting isk what version though. I think 4, if thats there.
#17
(08-04-2011, 08:44 AM)gbl08ma Wrote: With Linux there's kind of a rule, "don't touch it if it is working". For example, the VPS that hosts my blog has a huge RAM usage (250MB or above), but as it's working well and stable (150+ days uptime), I'm not going to touch it Smile
And BTW I don't think I every performed an apt-get upgrade or yum update on a VPS.

I have the opposite attitude, especially on an OpenVZ VPS where you never have to reboot for a kernel upgrade. I upgrade everything as soon as possible. Of course I'm confident I can fix whatever problems I encounter.

But do whatever works for you Smile
#18
(08-05-2011, 11:24 AM)f8ll Wrote: I have the opposite attitude, especially on an OpenVZ VPS where you never have to reboot for a kernel upgrade. I upgrade everything as soon as possible. Of course I'm confident I can fix whatever problems I encounter.

But do whatever works for you Smile

Ahem, firstly you can't run your own kernel in OpenVZ. Secondly, unless you have Ksplice Uptrack (3.95$ per month), you'd need to reboot.

-Bolts.
http://LoomHosts.com - VPS Hosting (Unmanaged). | Reliable, Affordable, Solid.
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#19
(08-06-2011, 09:37 PM)Boltersdriveer Wrote: Ahem, firstly you can't run your own kernel in OpenVZ. Secondly, unless you have Ksplice Uptrack (3.95$ per month), you'd need to reboot.

-Bolts.

He didn't say anything about running his own kernel. Just a kernel upgrade (aka OS upgrade, as i understand. I'm pretty new to linux).
#20
(08-06-2011, 09:37 PM)Boltersdriveer Wrote: Ahem, firstly you can't run your own kernel in OpenVZ. Secondly, unless you have Ksplice Uptrack (3.95$ per month), you'd need to reboot.

-Bolts.

That's exactly why you never have to reboot Wink

A fork for Ksplice will probably show up soon now that Oracle bought them

@iCarrot
Thanks for covering my back! Smile A kernel upgrade is not necessarily an OS upgrade however, it just updates the kernel. Though it can bring new features and greater compatibility so you can see it as an OS upgrade in that regard. But you have no control over the kernel in an OpenVZ container - you can upgrade it or install your own. You pretty much don't have to worry about it.

Basically what I was getting at is that since there is no kernel to upgrade, you never really have a reason to reboot.


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