Windows Update KB890830 - Malicious Software Removal Tool X64 - is it really needed??
#21
(2017-07-25, 8:35:25 pm)Davv Wrote: What if somebody don't have "legal" copy, or use same copy for more than one computer?
Earlier, when it was XP era, there was similiar tool from Microsoft, which caused PC to hang/restart and it almost blocked using OS, and it was very, very frustrating.

Could this tool be like previous one?

Nope.  The two have nothing to do with one another.  Although they're probably both equally intrusive with going into the registry.  I don't know how people operate their computers with no legal copy.  Something like that only happened once to me with Windows XP when a well meaning technician who built my computer in 2008 loaded Windows XP professional - gave me a home license that I paid for but didn't get the license number - I had to buy a new license.  However when Microsoft discovered this I got an instant black screen.  And plenty of warning messages that came up from time to time.

Anyway, the tool I'm talking about is one that I've now learned comes with each Windows update session.  I'll keep seeing it until the end of time.  It's supposed to be an added tool for getting rid of pre-existing viruses or malware that pre-dates any new ones.  Microsoft says in its write up that the tool will not interfere with one's anti-virus and malware programs.  As far as I can see once the tool has done its job it's gone and the next time one has to load it again for the new session.  Like it has the appearance of disposable and one-off operation for any one given update session.

I have a great problem with trust however, so have made the decision every update session not to download it.  My worry is that whether Microsoft says differently or not, the tool may see my anti-malware or anti-virus as viruses in their own right and go into conflict.  I'm probably wrong, but I'm not willing to take a chance.
#22
@deanhills I meant there is no problem with the Microsoft Software removal tool with antivirus applications, not antivirus applications with Microsoft.

Win7 is EOL, so don't get your hopes up.


Microsoft allows unlicensed copies, I am running one in a VM.

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#23
(2017-08-04, 11:54:28 pm)MichaelW Wrote: Win7 is EOL, so don't get your hopes up.

Windows 7 is not EOL! Security updates are provided until some date in 2020. Only feature updates have been stopped. And I can tell based on the businesses I work in that Windows 7 may get extended special support for business such as Microsoft did with XP.

Darn... recently even XP got an update that all XP versions got regardless of business. It was a critical update.
#24
(2017-07-23, 9:49:57 am)deanhills Wrote: I don't trust the tool.  I'm worried that it may go into conflict with my anti-malware and anti-virus software, also that Microsoft is using it dishonestly for an objective that I am unaware off and can be to my detriment - I just don't trust Microsoft.


I guess you just worry too much. IMO that Malicious Software Removal Tool X64 should be safe to be installed.

Of course you have your rights to say you don't trust Microsoft. This is understandable. But as long as you continue using Windows, you have to trust Microsoft. Their codes are not open sourced and you can only download the binaries anyway.

If you don't trust Microsoft, you simply should not use Windows at all. If you are really panic, you could run your Windows on a VM.
#25
(2017-08-05, 3:22:13 pm)try3vps Wrote: I guess you just worry too much. IMO that Malicious Software Removal Tool X64 should be safe to be installed.  
True.  A couple of days ago I had an update session, i.e. worked through all of Microsoft's updates for the session and selected the ones I wanted for installation.  The Malicious Software Removal Tool got installed by accident. I don't think I've got any hazzles with it any more. 

(2017-08-05, 3:22:13 pm)try3vps Wrote: Of course you have your rights to say you don't trust Microsoft. This is understandable. But as long as you continue using Windows, you have to trust Microsoft. Their codes are not open sourced and you can only download the binaries anyway.

If you don't trust Microsoft, you simply should not use Windows at all. If you are really panic, you could run your Windows on a VM.
Nope.  I don't have to trust Microsoft to use Windows, but yes, hopefully one day in the dizzy future I'll be able to let go of Windows.  In the meanwhile I learn to live with Microsoft as best as I can and probably should thank Microsoft as if it hadn't given me reason to mistrust its updates, I wouldn't have learned as much as I have over the last year or two.




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