How to easily update a clean installation of Windows 7 with WSUS Offline Update Tool
#1
Windows 7 is currently one of the less complicated Windows around, however since it's been around for 8 years there are virtually hundreds of updates to install.  Even high spec computers will go into a flat spin or freeze when automatic updates are attempted after a clean install of Windows 7.  

I've just updated an old Lenovo Thinkpad X201 (8 GB RAM and 500 GB Hard disk) Windows Professional 7 with WSUS Offline Update Tool and was totally blown away how simple it was.  How it works is that one uploads selective Microsoft Updates with the WSUS tool, then one goes offline and installs all of the updates in offline mode.  Once the updates  have been uploaded it probably took about half an hour tops for Microsoft to configure the updates for Windows 7.  It was a pleasure to work with as all of it worked flawlessly.

After the offline installation of the updates I installed the Microsoft update tool, and then took a risk to check which updates were still available.  I braced myself for a deluge, but after about 30 minutes or so it came up with only 125 important updates and 65 optional updates.  Next I went on to download and install the important updates first, and then after dropping 4 of the optional updates, I downloaded and installed the optional updates as well.  The laptop is now completely up to date.  I genuinely thought I was going to struggle with a heavy Windows, but anything but.  There was a marked improvement in the performance of Windows.  I didn't once have a hickup with installing the updates.  Never felt there was a slowdown.  I'm now seriously considering to do the exact same for my Desktop Computer, as my Desktop is also on a Windows 7 Professional clean installation that hasn't been updated ... yet.

Here are the steps I followed - you need to have approximately 2-3 hours depending on your device specs and internet connection:

1. If you're using a laptop, it is a good idea to turn off the sleep and hibernation mode of your laptop or desktop and also to keep your laptop on 100% charging all of the time.  Reason being if you're busy with lots of downloads, when the laptop or desktop goes into sleep mode then they stop downloading.  All you need to do is type "power options" in the search box, and it will then take you to Control Panel\All Control Panel Items\Power Options.  You then have two options for the "Plan Settings" of your laptop for when your computer is in charge mode or when your computer is on battery.  I changed the charge mode for sleep to "never".  I did the same for my desktop computer. 

2. Second most important thing you need to do and this is REALLY very important.  You need to go to your Windows Update Settings and change it to "Never check for updates".  You do this by typing "Windows Updates" in your search box and then change the Windows Update Settings.

3. You are now ready to download the latest version of WSUS Offline.  Navigate to:
http://download.wsusoffline.net/

In the right hand bar click on the most recent version and it will start to download the program for you.  The current version is Version 11.0.3.  Once downloaded run the executable file.  Then unzip the folder.  Once unzipped navigate and the file folder will contain the files as per below:

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4. Click on the UpdateGenerator executable file and it will bring up the following dashboard:

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The less ticks you make the better of course but there are a great many options you can choose from.  You can also add Microsoft Office Updates if you want to.  I used the above default options and ticked Windows 7 64 bit as per above.  Once the options have been ticked, click on "Start".

Then follows approximately an hour depending on your Internet Connection for the downloads to be completed.  It works with the computer's command prompt.  When it has been completed this screen comes up:

[Image: KfoCqL1.png]

5. You are now ready for the offline portion of the update installation.  First you need to disconnect your internet so that you are completely offline.

6.  Then go back to the wsusoffline folder and click on the second folder "client".

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This is the content of the client folder:

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7.  Make doubly sure your internet is disconnected and then click on the UpdateInstaller executable file - it is second from the bottom of the files.  This is the dashboard that comes up when you click on the Installer:

[Image: MKw7ycf.png]

The above are the options that I selected.  I'll probably run this tomorrow for my desktop computer as well.

8.  Once all of the updates have been installed, it will prompt one to reboot the computer if you didn't click the Automatic reboot option.  Windows will then reconfigure all of the updates.  That may take some time depending on your internet connection but it will be well under the hour.

9.  Once the updates have been completed go to "Windows Updates" and change the settings to:
"Download updates but let me choose whether to install them"

10.  Then click on the Updates link "Check for Updates".  Windows will let you know that you haven't installed the Update Tool yet and will help you install it.  Following which it will take some time - anything up to 45 minutes or longer to check for the updates.  When I did it today it came up with 125 important updates and 65 optional updates.  I then first ticked all of the 125 important updates and let Windows install and configure those.  Then worked my way through the 65 optional ones, dropped 4 of them and ticked the balance of them. 

11.  Once the Windows updates have been installed you need to go back a few times to "Check for Updates", as the updates trigger updates of updates.  It took me probably about 4 times until Windows Updates came up clean and up to date.  Quite a nice sight to see.

12.  It is now up to you whether you want to get automatic updates from Windows or continue with "Let me choose".  I'll probably stick with the latter.  Microsoft redeemed itself a little as when I went through the important updates, almost all of them were security updates.  None of the usual junk.  Even the optional recommended ones looked OK to go.  In the end I found the performance of Windows on the laptop much better.  So can recommend the updates.  Hopefully all will go well when I do my desktop tomorrow as well.  Cross fingers. Happy

Today I took the plunge and also updated my Windows 7 Professional Clean Install on my Desktop Computer.  My Desktop is a Dell Optiplex 9020 i7-4770 CPU@3.40 GHz 64-bit operating system.  It had 8 GB RAM in 2014 when I purchased it and when I reformatted it in December 2016 I upgraded it to 16 GB RAM.  Although I had asked the vendor at the time of purchase to install Windows 7 Professional, it installed Home Ultimate at the time, so when I upgraded it I did a clean install of Windows 7 Professional.  I had purchased two licenses around 2014 just to make sure that when I upgraded it one day that the licenses would be available to me.

Tonight I was stumped as my Laptop Thinkpad X201 i5 with 8 GB RAM was and still is much more responsive and MUCH faster than my desktop computer.  How is that possible?  All I can think is that the Lenovo ThinkPad configuration must be much better than Dell's, maybe better quality parts too? 

Here are the specs for the Lenovo Thinkpad X201 (2010):
https://support.lenovo.com/za/en/solutions/pd010141

And here are the specs for the Dell Optiplex 9020 (2014):
https://www.intel.com/buy/us/en/product/...ifications

I clocked the updates tonight for my Desktop Computer.  The WSUS portion of the updates took 1 hour for the download of the WSUS updates and approximately 10 minutes for the installation and configuration.  I then did the same as my laptop and checked for Windows Updates afterwards.  It took the desktop approx 20 minutes to come up with more or less the same number of updates as the laptop - 125 important updates and a little less optional - 61 updates.  Then during the installation the desktop was not as quick in response, nor flawless as the laptop had been.  There were a few errors in the installation of the updates as well contrary to the laptop that experienced no errors.  I also found the desktop going slower after each installation.  It didn't do all of the updates I asked at the same time either.  The Windows updates on the Microsoft side took about 3 hours in all to complete on the desktop compared with about 2 hours for the laptop. Then when I started to use my computer I find programs responding slower - laptop had an improved performance.  Hopefully it will sort itself out eventually but it completely intrigues me that the laptop that is older (2010) and with less specs is that faster.

While I was waiting for the desktop updates to complete - I was working on the ThinkPad and wow, it's like a Porsche.  Can't hold it back.  Super fast and super responsive.  I've now also loaded Malwarebytes on it, and think I'm going to give it a week or two before I go for my experiment with loading Windows 10 Enterprise LTSB 2016 on it. 

Verdict on the WSUS Offline Update Tool.  It works great.  I remember the last time when I had a clean install with my desktop when I first purchased it in 2014 and I had put it on automatic updates and it took me maybe two days to load with plenty of freezing in between.  The WSUS tool takes the sting out of the updates.  Also, I'm sure Microsoft has got its act together a little.  I was wary of the October 2017 Quality Rollup, but survived it.  Regrettably the desktop computer is slower than it was before (for now).  Hopefully it will work out all of the kinks as it had in 2014 when I first loaded Windows updates on it.  Mind you, maybe it's just the way the vendor configured the machine as there is a similarity in update slowness between 2014 and now.  Beginning to wonder how authentic my Dell desktop really is.  Including not receiving Windows 7 professional at the time of delivery when Windows 7 professional was part of the specs.
#2
Just yesterday I also reinstalled Windows 7 Pro on my old laptop. I use SP1 Media refresh edition. I think it's the last official ISO from msdn but still need to apply many windows update.
I use different tool with the same functionality as wsus.
It's called KUC. Here's the link: http://windows-update-checker.com
It's worth trying as it also checking for superseded update and uninstalled it.
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#3
(2017-10-23, 9:44:31 pm)underd0g Wrote: Just yesterday I also reinstalled Windows 7 Pro on my old laptop. I use SP1 Media refresh edition. I think it's the last official ISO from msdn but still need to apply many windows update.
I use different tool with the same functionality as wsus.
It's called KUC. Here's the link: http://windows-update-checker.com
It's worth trying as it also checking for superseded update and uninstalled it.

Many thanks for the link.  Looks as though there are many ways these days to update Windows 7 Pro clean installation.  There is still enough of a demand for Windows 7 Pro for geeks to invest time in sharing their update tools with others.  I find that commendable.  On the other hand, I've found a really big difference with my 2014 attempt to load Windows 7 updates on a new computer for the first time. I remember I was still trusting of Microsoft at the time enough to be as naive as to put my new system on automatic updates.  It took two days of blood sweat and tears - with plenty of freezing to finally load all of the updates.  My experience with Microsoft updates two days ago was just the opposite.  Somewhere along the lines Microsoft got better organized.  We now have important and optional updates, and none of the junk updates that had been there before.  The important updates are genuinely important.  And the optional recommended ones well worth using.  Also, the download, installation and configuration of the updates by Microsoft are much more streamlined and seamless than they had been in 2014.  They're almost instinctive and much faster than they had been in 2014 - like lightning fast in comparison (2014 being snail pace to freezing).  Microsoft hasn't completely redeemed itself with me to want to go back to automatic updates, but I have to give the devil its due.  My desktop computer seems to be perfect now with the updates - completely up to date.  I think what had slowed it down initially while I was working with Windows updates was Kaspersky anti-virus in the background.  Took about a day and my desktop is as fast as it was before I loaded the updates. The laptop is on Microsoft Security Essentials anti-virus - a much lighter and less intrusive anti-virus in comparison with Kaspersky.
#4
I don't update windows because i don't want to get those privacy stolen from me. Btw anyway good job on the tutorial but i have already used this and worked like charm before
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#5
(2017-10-25, 9:27:49 am)Kururin Wrote: I don't update windows because i don't want to get those privacy stolen from me. Btw anyway good job on the tutorial but i have already used this and worked like charm before

Thanks for the feedback @Karurin.  Good point.  Although Microsoft is not alone in wanting to steal privacy from us.  I guess all of the products we're using from Google Search Engine, Adobe PDF etc etc put us at risk as well. 

Reason I did the updates was a first step to installing Windows 10 Enterprise as my Lenovo ThinkPad would not update the BIOS without the technical updates of Windows 7 - all of that worked well and my BIOS is updated now, although my experience with Windows 7 Professional now that it is up to date is so good, I'm now hesitating with upgrading to Windows 10 - I'll wait a couple of weeks first  Tongueout  

A few months ago after the clean install of Windows 7 Professional on my desktop - January 2017, I had decided not to update my Windows 7 for the same reason as you chose not to do so either - Privacy - and I was still very upset with what Microsoft had done with the updates when it tried to force me to upgrade to Windows 10.  But I knew the functionality of my desktop was not as good as it should be.  Like little things like the scrolling down a page was not working OK - because of technical updates that I had missed.  Since the updates for Windows 7 Professional had worked so well - actually improving the performance of my laptop, I decided to update my desktop in the same way.  The scrolling issue has now been fixed. To tell you the truth, I wonder whether Microsoft has much more access to my Windows than before the updates.  I'd be far more wary with Windows 10 updates, than with Windows 7.
#6
(2017-10-25, 2:33:19 pm)deanhills Wrote: Thanks for the feedback @Karurin.  Good point.  Although Microsoft is not alone in wanting to steal privacy from us.  I guess all of the products we're using from Google Search Engine, Adobe PDF etc etc put us at risk as well. 

I think on this technology era, there is no privacy protection except whois privacy protect Rofl  if you wanna use their tools.
So can i use it on my win 10? i'm worried the files are broken after updated (from third party)
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#7
(2017-10-26, 2:38:00 am)noballz Wrote: I think on this technology era, there is no privacy protection except whois privacy protect Rofl  if you wanna use their tools.
So can i use it on my win 10? i'm worried the files are broken after updated (from third party)

Agreed with you about the privacy protection.  Nothing is private and even less so in dealings with Microsoft and all of the other big name players in the industry.  I have no personal experience with Windows 10 other than what I've read, and as far as I understand unless you have Windows 10 Enterprise LTSB 2016 or Windows 10 Professional, you don't get a choice with turning updates off.  They're forced on you automatically whether you want them or not.  I think with Windows 10 Professional the updates are deferred - like somewhere along the lines they will always come back to haunt you.  With Windows 10 Enterprise LTSB you can decide which updates you want.  

Haha .... Laugh  I've just Googled this and here's an ingenious way of fighting the automatic updates - by changing the WiFi settings Metered Connection to "on".  This will reduce data usage and stop Windows updates from being downloaded.  This will also be a way to defer the Windows 10 updates - like as long as that Metered Connection remains "on" they won't be downloaded.  Looks good "in theory" but don't know what it will be like in practice with your other downloads.  If you want to try it out you can check the suggestion at this site:
http://www.techadvisor.co.uk/how-to/wind...s-3626701/
#8
The staff and other members would highly appreciate it if people interested in the discussion would stay on topic instead of branching into the world of linux, dual-boot, browsers, default search engines and privacy. This isn't really the right place to debate some of that. And to be honest, there is no place to debate privacy because it's pointless these days.

Have a nice day and please reach for the nearest cookie jar and enjoy one to make you feel better Smile

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